English BA

“Studying English improves your perspicacity, articulacy and engagement in life. It permanently increases your enjoyment of reading, and it makes you a more penetrating, sceptical and appreciative reader of everything from lyric poetry to literary criticism to newspaper articles to political speeches.

This degree introduces you to some of the most complex and beautiful texts that have been written in the English language, in Britain and around the world.

As a graduate of this programme you will have a good intellectual and cultural basis for careers in areas such as academia, journalism, politics, and many others.”

Download the English BA brochure

 

 

Dr Catherine Brown BA (Cantab), MSc, MA (Lond), PhD (Cantab), Convenor & Senior Lecturer in English and Jess, Duff Miller, English BA with Philosophy
Dr Catherine Brown BA (Cantab), MSc, MA (Lond), PhD (Cantab), Convenor & Senior Lecturer in English and Jess, Duff Miller, English BA with Philosophy
This isn't just an English BA

English BA

Syllabus - English BA

This English BA aims to develop your ability to engage with English literature. In the third year you will have the opportunity to broaden your studies to American literature, Anglophone literature not originating in the British Isles or the United States ('postcolonial' literature), and genres such as drama.

In your first year

You will study four English BA modules.

Explorations in Literature

This module introduces a wide range of works from the literary canon, from ancient Greek texts in translation to the contemporary, covering the major genres, and embodying significant interventions or influences in literary history. The emphasis is on reading primary texts voraciously and discovering, or rediscovering, diverse writers and cultures, so that you can make informed choices from more specialized modules later in their programme. Not being limited to a period, genre or single approach, the module cultivates difference and chronological sweep; it aims to challenge and surprise, as rewarding ‘exploration’ should.

Approaches to Text

This module introduces you to essential concepts in modern literary study, enabling you to become a more observant, perceptive and analytical reader and critic in your own right. You are introduced to the history and nature of literary studies, and to contemporary critical debates. You learn a vocabulary in which to discuss literary language, ideas of literary convention and genre, poetic rhythm and form, and the nature of narrative voice and narrative structures. You are introduced to debates about the relation of texts on the page to texts in performance, and to wider questions about the interpretation of texts.

Introduction to Creative Writing

This module introduces you to some of the key concepts involved in Creative Writing. You are introduced to a writing practice in three different styles of writing (writing fiction, writing poetry and writing for the stage), and will explore how to differentiate between the approaches needed for each style. The module will help you to develop an awareness of not only the contexts into which you write, but some of the different techniques that can be used to grow your writing. The module further aims to develop your understanding of Creative Writing in its literary contexts, using texts you may study elsewhere on your programme as examples. As such, this module ties your writing practice very closely to your reading practice, which you may find helpful in subsequent study in the wider field of English.

Renaissance Comedy: Shakespeare and Jonson

This module provides you with an introduction to the works of Shakespeare and Jonson within the genre of ‘comedy’, and seeks to draw attention to the principles of classification which enable these plays to be seen as forming a group.

Starting with the hypothesis that the plays themselves may be problematic for such formulations, the module will examine the cultural specificity of the term ‘comedy’, and the extent to which these plays are part of a process which redefined the role of drama in Elizabethan/Jacobean society. The plays will be treated primarily as literary texts but you will be encouraged to consider the possibilities for interpretation which a ‘stage-centred’ critical approach produces.

The plays will be placed in the context of a new dramatic practice which arose within a London of competing commercial and political interests, and you will be required to grasp an overview of the forces shaping the creative production of Shakespeare and Jonson. The demands of the market for which the dramatists were producing, the operation of patronage, the expectations of theatre audiences, and the role of censorship will be considered, and the module will attempt to read through the plays to find the ‘marks’ of these influences.

In your second year

You will study four English BA modules, each of which is a period paper:

Renaissance & Restoration

This module offers an overview of English literature and literary culture in the period from the reign of Henry VIII (the lyric poets Thomas Wyatt and the Earl of Surrey) to the satirists and dramatists of the Restoration. Among topics which you may study are: women and writing in the early modern period; Jacobean drama; the origins of Elizabethan tragedy; literature of the Commonwealth; Restoration comedy; surveys of the period and other more specialist topics.

Augustans & Romantics

This module draws together two periods of English literary history that have traditionally been seen in strong contrast; an antithesis which was frequently underscored by critical manifestoes issued during the eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries. The module explores what appear to be the important distinctions, but also considers continuities that may exist between the two periods.

Victorians

This module considers a range of textual forms typical of the Victorian period, with reference to poetry, fiction and drama in the nineteenth century. The module will develop your understanding of change and continuity in the literary culture of the period, provide a context for the application of a wide range of critical approaches to the literature of the period, and enable you to handle with confidence a range of terms used in contemporary readings of Victorian literature such as ‘realism’, ‘naturalism’, and ‘Darwinism’.

Moderns

This module considers a range of textual forms typical of the modern and contemporary period, being concerned with poetry, fiction and drama in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The module will develop your understanding of change and continuity in the literary culture of the period, provide a context for the application of a wide range of critical approaches to the literature of the period, and enable you to handle with confidence a range of terms used in contemporary readings of 20th and 21st century literature, for example, ‘modern’, ‘postmodern’ and ‘postcolonial’.

In your third year

You will study four English BA modules, each of which concerns a genre or geographical region:

American Literature

This module introduces you to the diverse literatures and literary trends of the United States of America, from its early inception as a colonial project through to the present day, ranging across the seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and exploring the main concepts and contestations which have underpinned the evolution - and various re-shapings - of what has come to be known as ‘American’ literature. 

The main areas that will be covered in this course - which proceeds thematically rather than strictly chronologically - include: colonial visions of America; postcolonial/revolutionary and republican inventions of the nation, including Transcendentalism; Native American literature, culture and identity; the Frontier, the West and Manifest Destiny; regional literatures, including the Southern Gothic; constructions and treatments of race and ethnicity, including the literature of slavery, African-American writing, constructions of whiteness and white anxieties, Jewish-American writing; constructions of gender and sexuality, including writing by women, treatments of ‘masculinity,’ and queer texts; and the impact of modernity and globalisation, especially within modernist/postmodernist American writing, including the ‘Lost’ and ‘Beat’ generations. 

You will consider a range of genres (prose fiction, short stories, poetry, plays), and their connections to other creative mediums (especially visual cultures and music), and will be encouraged to explore a host of literary modes (Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Postmodernism) as they have been constituted and contested in various American contexts.

Drama Since 1860

This module aims to provide you with historical and critical perspectives on the major thematic and stylistic developments in a selection of British, American and European drama between 1860 and the present day. The module encourages you to trace the relationship between the theory and practice of the dramatists listed and seeks to examine the way in which the choice of style or presentation, be it realism, expressionism or the avant-garde, might be seen to reflect the thematic concerns of their plays. The module will also encourage you to consider the relationship between the dramatic text on the page and play in performance, where appropriate.

The Novel

This module aims to provide you with some historical and critical perspectives on an evolving aesthetic form central to English Studies. Focusing on both works originally written in English and ones in translation, the module surveys selected novels in three broad chronological groupings: eighteenth and nineteenth-century realist novels; early twentieth-century modernist novels; and finally a wide-ranging exploration of the major themes and characteristic narrative strategies associated with ‘anti-realist’ or ‘postmodern’ works of fiction in the later twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. 

The module encourages you to consider some relevant theoretical questions on the nature of narrative and the role of the reader, together with critical writing on a variety of topics, ranging from mimesis to genre. Attention will also be given to narrative techniques, including characterisation, use of imagery, narrative voice, scene-making - the strategies of fiction whereby novelists develop individual structures that enable them to say something new in fictional terms.

Postcolonial Literatures in English

This module will primarily examine the range of literature produced since 1947 in the regions of the world formerly under British rule. You may study literature from the former ‘white Dominions’ such as Australia and Canada, as well as literature from Asia, Africa and the Caribbean and work produced by the various diasporas of Commonwealth origin within contemporary western societies such as Britain. 

Themes to be explored include: representations of ‘the metropolitan centre’ and ‘the periphery’; postcolonial interactions with the metropolitan centre through British colonial novels; disillusion with independence; problems of identity and cultural identification; exile and diaspora; neo-colonialism; the role of the intellectual and the artist; the subversion of western literary form; the usages of the English language; problems and opportunities of the postcolonial woman.

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, modules may be subject to change.  All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2015-2016 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

Learning - English

How will I be taught?

Here, each student is given the individual attention they need in order to reach their academic, personal and professional potential. For each module, you will attend two lectures plus one weekly one-to-one or small group tutorial for ten weeks. Each week, you’ll experience a range of dynamic teaching styles including:

Lectures

You study two modules in English concurrently in each of the Michaelmas and Hilary terms for a total of four modules in each academic year. Our highly qualified lecturers have teaching experience and research interests in the relevant subject area and will lead two lectures in each module, each week.

One-to-one tutorials

In your one-to-one tutorial the tutor engages critically with you, entering into your individual point of view and working with you to clarify, challenge, defend, and develop your arguments and ideas. You prepare an essay of up to 2,000 words for every one-to-one tutorial related to one of the degree modules you are studying during that term. Your essay will be the basis of your discussion with your tutor. This form of intellectual engagement is considered to be the gold standard for identifying and drawing out a student’s potential.

Small group tutorials

In small group tutorials, you and a small group of students will meet with your tutor to discuss one of the themes of the module. You will always be required to read in preparation for each of your small group tutorials and you will also present an argument for a certain number of them. These will be an opportunity for you to discuss and debate with your tutor and your fellow students and to give and receive both praise and constructive criticism.

Assessment

Your tutors will assess your essays and your performance in tutorials. Your marks for these assignments are intended to help you identify gaps in your learning and knowledge as well as provide guidance for your private study, and these marks will not contribute to your degree classification. At the end of term, you will have a Collection in which you will receive verbal feedback from all of your English tutors.

You will study the University of London degree syllabus and your examinations will be set and marked by the University of London. The Introduction to Creative Writing module is assessed by coursework. All other modules are assessed by an exam of three, or three and a quarter hours, sat in May. In order to be awarded an honours degree, you are required to have been examined in, and to have completed to the satisfaction of the University of London, the equivalent of 12 full modules.

On successful completion of the undergraduate programme, you will be awarded a University of London degree and the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

How many students will be in my degree class?

Lectures: 30 to 60
One-to-one tutorials: 1
Small group tutorials: 2 to 3

Entry Requirements

What do I need to get in?

Admissions tutors at NCH don’t just look at exam grades. Instead we look primarily at the individual. Written work samples and references are critical for assessing each applicant’s potential to flourish in our rigorous academic environment. We also place great importance on meeting candidates directly through open days, and interviews with senior academic staff. Many of our successful candidates will achieve AAA A-level grades or 36 points at IB Diploma (or equivalent). However, we have accepted candidates with AAB and ABB A-level grades on the basis that we believe in their potential, which might not have been reflected in their one-off performance in an exam room.

To enrol for the University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the University of London entrance requirements. In practice the College’s entrance requirements exceed these requirements in nearly every case so this is not usually an issue.

As a very general guide, the College regards the following qualifications as approximately equivalent to AAB at A-level or 36 points at IB Diploma. We can also assess almost all international qualifications not listed here:

A-level

AAB and five GCSEs

IB Diploma

36 points (including core points) with 6, 6, 6 at Higher Level

Pre-U

D3D3D3

Scottish Highers

AAABB (AA at Advanced Highers)

European Baccalaureate

85% overall

Advanced Placements

555

Belgian Certificat d’Enseignement 

18

French Baccalaureate

Overall score of 15, or 14 if taken with the International Option

German Abitur

1.3 overall

Irish Leaving Certificate

AAAAAB at Higher/Honours Level

Italian Esame di Stato

Average score of 95

Spanish Títulado de Bachillerato

Overall score of 9

Swiss Certificat de Maturité

Overall mark of 5

Additional subject specific requirements

Economics BSc

A-Level Mathematics, preferably Higher Level in Mathematics although we will consider students with Standard Level Mathematics or Mathematical Studies in the IB Diploma, or completion of an NCH summer Mathematics course.

English BA

A-level English or Higher Level English in the IB Diploma.

Politics BSc

GCSE Maths with a minimum grade of C

To enrol for the University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the University of London entrance requirements. In practice the College’s entrance requirements exceed these requirements in nearly every case so this is not usually an issue.

Meet Our Students

Lizzie

English BA with Art History

As part of the Creative Writing English Literature course at NCH, we have the pleasure of being entertained by various guest speakers who come for an informal discussion on why they write, and why we should want to…

Lizzie
English BA with Art History

As part of the Creative Writing English Literature course at NCH, we have the pleasure of being entertained by various guest speakers who come for an informal discussion on why they write, and why we should want to…

Faculty

Dr Catherine Brown

BA (Cantab), MSc, MA (Lond), PhD (Cantab)

Catherine studied English under J H Prynne at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. She moved out into academic and practical politics, lived in New York and Moscow and learned Russian and Spanish, before returning to Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge for her PhD.

Dr Catherine Brown
BA (Cantab), MSc, MA (Lond), PhD (Cantab)

Catherine studied English under J H Prynne at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. She moved out into academic and practical politics, lived in New York and Moscow and learned Russian and Spanish, before returning to Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge for her PhD.

Dr Charlotte Grant

BA (Cantab), MA (Courtauld Institute), PhD (Cantab)

Charlotte has a BA (first class honours) and a PhD in English from Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and an MA in Art History from the Courtauld Institute.

Dr Charlotte Grant
BA (Cantab), MA (Courtauld Institute), PhD (Cantab)

Charlotte has a BA (first class honours) and a PhD in English from Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and an MA in Art History from the Courtauld Institute.

Mr Howard Jacobson

BA (Cantab)

Best known for his 2010 Man Booker winning novel The Finkler Question, Howard will lecture and meet students informally at NCH to discuss literature and writing.

Mr Howard Jacobson
BA (Cantab)

Best known for his 2010 Man Booker winning novel The Finkler Question, Howard will lecture and meet students informally at NCH to discuss literature and writing.

Dr Peter Maber

BA, MPhil, PhD (Cantab)

Peter studied for his PhD under Anne Barton at Trinity College, Cambridge, and has taught English and American literature at the University of Cambridge. He writes regularly on art for the TLS, and is also a composer; much of his research examines the connections (and disjunctions) between literature, the visual arts, and music.

Dr Peter Maber
BA, MPhil, PhD (Cantab)

Peter studied for his PhD under Anne Barton at Trinity College, Cambridge, and has taught English and American literature at the University of Cambridge. He writes regularly on art for the TLS, and is also a composer; much of his research examines the connections (and disjunctions) between literature, the visual arts, and music.

Sir Trevor Nunn

MA (Cantab)

Trevor Nunn is one of Britain’s most well-respected and influential theatre directors. After studying English under F R Leavis at Downing College, Cambridge, he became Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) at the age of 28.

Sir Trevor Nunn
MA (Cantab)

Trevor Nunn is one of Britain’s most well-respected and influential theatre directors. After studying English under F R Leavis at Downing College, Cambridge, he became Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) at the age of 28.

Dr Dan O’Hara

BA, MA (Warwick), MSt, DPhil (Oxon)

Dan is a Senior Lecturer for the English BA at New College of the Humanities. He graduated with a first class degree in English and American Literature at Warwick University, which he followed with an MA in English. Dan then moved to Christ Church, Oxford, to study for an MSt, which he achieved with distinction. Dan was awarded his DPhil on Machinic Fictions: a genealogy of machines in twentieth-century prose and art in 2007.

Dr Dan O’Hara
BA, MA (Warwick), MSt, DPhil (Oxon)

Dan is a Senior Lecturer for the English BA at New College of the Humanities. He graduated with a first class degree in English and American Literature at Warwick University, which he followed with an MA in English. Dan then moved to Christ Church, Oxford, to study for an MSt, which he achieved with distinction. Dan was awarded his DPhil on Machinic Fictions: a genealogy of machines in twentieth-century prose and art in 2007.

Professor Sir Christopher Ricks

BA, MA, BLitt (Oxon), FBA

Sir Christopher is Warren Professor of the Humanities, and Co-Director of the Editorial Institute, at Boston University, having formerly been professor of English at the University of Bristol and at Cambridge.

Professor Sir Christopher Ricks
BA, MA, BLitt (Oxon), FBA

Sir Christopher is Warren Professor of the Humanities, and Co-Director of the Editorial Institute, at Boston University, having formerly been professor of English at the University of Bristol and at Cambridge.

Mr Jaya Savige

BA, MPhil (UQ), PhD (Cantab, pending)

Jaya Savige is a prize-winning poet who studied for his PhD as a Gates Scholar at Christ’s College, Cambridge.

Mr Jaya Savige
BA, MPhil (UQ), PhD (Cantab, pending)

Jaya Savige is a prize-winning poet who studied for his PhD as a Gates Scholar at Christ’s College, Cambridge.

Dr Daniel Swift

BA (Oxon), PhD (Columbia University, NY)

Daniel has a BA (first class honours) from Oxford University and a PhD from Columbia University in New York. He is the author of Bomber County (Hamish Hamilton, 2010) and Shakespeare's Common Prayers (Oxford University Press, 2012).

Dr Daniel Swift
BA (Oxon), PhD (Columbia University, NY)

Daniel has a BA (first class honours) from Oxford University and a PhD from Columbia University in New York. He is the author of Bomber County (Hamish Hamilton, 2010) and Shakespeare's Common Prayers (Oxford University Press, 2012).

You study a total of 20 modules in the NCH undergraduate curriculum
Your contextual course comprises 4 additional modules.

In addition to your english literature degree studies, you will study four modules in another degree subject as part of the College’s broader liberal arts curriculum leading to the dual award of the English BA (Hons) and the NCH Diploma.

Students of the English BA can choose a contextual course in Art History, Classical Studies, Economics, History, Law, Philosophy, Politics & International Relations or Psychology.

These modules contextualise your learning in your english literature degree and are of particular interest to students whose interests and talents span different subject areas and issues.

Syllabus - Art History

The Art History contextual course includes four modules. The parameters have been set as widely as possible, from Europe to India, and over a time span that extends from antiquity to the modern period. The study will range across a variety of media from architecture to painting, sculpture, ceramics, metalwork and textiles.

Studying Art History trains you to look closely at buildings and objects, to analyse their physical dimensions and to seek out and understand the historical contexts in which they were made. The range of material used to explore the narrative of a work of art starts with the object itself but also relies on documentary and archaeological evidence, giving you the opportunity to approach a variety of moments in history through their architecture and material culture. The modules will be taught with illustrated lectures and will include visits to relevant buildings and collections as well as handling sessions of objects in museums, introducing a hands-on approach to the study of art.

Art History is currently available as a Contextual Course at New College of the Humanities. This four module course forms part of the broader liberal arts curriculum studied alongside each student’s degree. You can choose to study Art History alongside any of our undergraduate degrees.

In your first year

You will study two modules.

The Art & Architecture of the Islamic World

We will survey the full sweep of Islamic history from its beginnings in the 7th century up to 1900. The geographical range is similarly broad but concentrates on the core regions of the Islamic world, including Al-Andalus and Sicily but excluding Southeast Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Where appropriate lectures will focus on the artistic output of a single dynasty as this approach gives a clearer understanding of the historical and geographical context. Students will also look at the development of a medium across a span of time; this type of investigation will be supported by museum visits and handling sessions.

In your second year

You will study two further modules.

The Art & Architecture of Byzantium

The Eastern Roman Empire, widely-known as ‘the Byzantine Empire,’ was one of the longest-living state formations in world history. Beginning in AD 330 with the move of the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to Constantinople and ending with the capture of the latter city by the Ottoman Turks in 1453, Byzantine history extends over eleven centuries and covers a region stretching as far east as Iraq and as far west as Spain. Throughout the 'Middle Ages,’ Constantinople was the ultimate city, its name evoking grandeur; the manuscripts, enamels and silks of Byzantine workshops represented the highest degree of refinement. In modern French, ‘c’est Byzance’ (‘it is Byzantium’) denotes anything endowed with superlative magnificence. However, this artistic legacy remained shrouded in prejudice for centuries and only began to be systematically studied at the end of the nineteenth century.

Byzantine studies today represent one of the fastest-growing fields of scholarship in the humanities, with research conducted in dozens of languages across the globe. This course aims to provide a comprehensive survey of the architecture and other material culture of the Byzantine Empire, adopting a roughly chronological sequence. The examples will range from country chapels painted with enigmatic images to manuscripts created for emperors, claimed by kings and enshrined in museums. The objects will be examined in their historical and cultural context, as products of the complex and fascinating societies which developed during the millennial history of ‘Byzantium.’ A general bibliography of historical, art historical and archaeological works as well as specific bibliographies for the topics covered in each lecture will be provided. Visual material for each lecture will be prepared as a multimedia presentation and will be provided to the students as a revision tool. Assessment will be made through an essay and a slide test.

Modern Architecture: Global versus Regional

This is an introductory survey of modern architecture, which will investigate some of the competing positions or claims that have been made about its global and/or local significance. It will look at key buildings and projects from the late nineteenth century to the present, with a view to raising questions about the expectations for or pursuit of internationalism on the one hand, versus more vernacular or locally inflected approaches to design on the other. The term architecture will be foregrounded as a Western one, which has served to demarcate architecture as a form of art from building for more utilitarian ends, and indeed to demarcate European architecture from other kinds of building elsewhere in the world. The term modern will likewise be problematized, due to how it sets up a dichotomy of progressive and international versus static and traditional, and troubles attempts to adopt a more global approach to the study of architectural history.

The European and North American canon (i.e., from the ‘international style’ through to ‘critical regionalism’) will form the spine of this module, but efforts will be made throughout toward a more comparative history. In addition to covering some of the more canonical material, the relationship between the center and the periphery will be explored through special topics, which may include the architecture of world’s fairs, the idea of a ‘tropical modernism,’ diplomatic buildings like the United Nations Headquarters, Japanese Metabolism, and the pavilions of international art festivals. From the outset, you will begin to develop a sound basis for reading plans, elevations and photographic documents, as well as thinking critically about the built environment more generally.

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, modules may be subject to change.

Faculty

Dr Melanie Gibson

BA (Oxon), MA, PhD (SOAS)

Melanie has a BA in Arabic from St Anne’s College, Oxford. She took her MA and PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Since 2006 she has been director and tutor of the Islamic module of the Postgraduate Diploma in Asian Art at SOAS.

Dr Melanie Gibson
BA (Oxon), MA, PhD (SOAS)

Melanie has a BA in Arabic from St Anne’s College, Oxford. She took her MA and PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Since 2006 she has been director and tutor of the Islamic module of the Postgraduate Diploma in Asian Art at SOAS.

Dr George Manginis

BA (Athens), MA, PhD (Lond)

Originally from Greece, George took his BA in Archaeology at the University of Athens. He then moved to London where he completed his MA and PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).

Dr George Manginis
BA (Athens), MA, PhD (Lond)

Originally from Greece, George took his BA in Archaeology at the University of Athens. He then moved to London where he completed his MA and PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).

Dr Joel Robinson

BA (Alberta), MA (Western Ontario), PhD (Essex)

Joel is Lecturer for the Art History contextual course at New College of the Humanities, He is an historian of architectural culture, visual art and landscape in the modern and contemporary periods. He holds a BA Honors (1995) in Art History from the University of Alberta in Edmonton (Canada), and an MA in Art History (1997) from the University of Western Ontario in London (Canada), where he began his teaching career.

Dr Joel Robinson
BA (Alberta), MA (Western Ontario), PhD (Essex)

Joel is Lecturer for the Art History contextual course at New College of the Humanities, He is an historian of architectural culture, visual art and landscape in the modern and contemporary periods. He holds a BA Honors (1995) in Art History from the University of Alberta in Edmonton (Canada), and an MA in Art History (1997) from the University of Western Ontario in London (Canada), where he began his teaching career.

Learning - Art History

How will I be taught?

Your lectures will be with a mix of first and second year students studying Art History as a Contextual Course. You will attend group seminars twice a term and discuss your essays independently with your tutors.

Assessment

You will complete two assignments for each of your Contextual Course modules. Your grades for these assignments will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

How many students will be in my degree class?

Lectures: 50
Seminars: 10 to 15

Syllabus - Classical Studies

The Classical Studies Contextual Course at New College of the Humanities forms part of the broader liberal arts curriculum that each student pursues alongside their undergraduate degree. You can choose to do Classical Studies as your Contextual Course, whichever degree subject you are studying.

Classical Studies comprises eight half-modules over two years, on Greek and Roman history, literature and philosophy. Besides exploring the great ancient historians Herodotus, Thucydides and Tacitus, you will discover in the writings of Homer, Sophocles, Virgil and others some of the masterpieces of epic, tragedy and lyric poetry, and come to grips with the thought and writings of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle and Epicurus.

Your engagement with Classical Studies will lead towards a concluding module that examines the rich legacy of the classical world in its many aspects – in literature and law, in the arts, and in the work of historians, philosophers and political thinkers in the modern period.

In your first year

You will study four half modules.

Early Greek Philosophy

Further details for this module will be available in summer 2014.

Greek Historians

Further details for this module will be published in summer 2014.

Greek Poetry

Further details for this module will be published in summer 2014.

Plato

Further details for this module will be published in summer 2014.

In your second year

You will study four further half modules.

Later Ancient Philosophy

Further details for this module will be available in summer 2014.

Roman History & Oratory

Further details for this module will be published in summer 2014.

Latin Literature

Further details for this module will be published in summer 2014.

The Classical Legacy

Further details for this module will be published in summer 2014.

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, modules may be subject to change. 

Faculty

Professor AC Grayling

MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA

AC Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon) FRSL, FRSA is Master of the New College of the Humanities, and a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford. Until 2011 he was Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Professor AC Grayling
MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA

AC Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon) FRSL, FRSA is Master of the New College of the Humanities, and a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford. Until 2011 he was Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Dr David Mitchell

BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon) MSc (LSE)

David obtained a double first in Literae Humaniores at Oxford and went on to complete a DPhil there on problems of rationality in epistemology and ethics. He has taught philosophy at the University of Cambridge and the University of London.

Dr David Mitchell
BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon) MSc (LSE)

David obtained a double first in Literae Humaniores at Oxford and went on to complete a DPhil there on problems of rationality in epistemology and ethics. He has taught philosophy at the University of Cambridge and the University of London.

Learning - Classical Studies

How will I be taught?

Your lectures will be with a mix of first and second year students studying Classical Studies as a Contextual Course. You will attend group seminars twice a term and discuss your essays independently with your tutors.

Assessment

You will complete two assignments for each of your Contextual Course modules. Your grades for these assignments will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

Why choose Classical Studies Contextual Course?

In keeping with the ancient model of education in the humanities, Classical Studies offers a varied but integrated course that connects in stimulating ways with other humanities degree subjects.

If you choose English as your degree subject, Classical Studies will deepen your acquaintance with literary forms and their diverse uses. For students of History, becoming familiar with the classical period can provide the most instructive of models, and of contrasts too. And in the study of both philosophy and of political thought, investigation of the pervasive classical influences can be truly illuminating.

In any liberal education, the paradigms of the classical world are implicitly present. Formal study of the Greek and Roman authors, while introducing us to a world both remote and strange, also allows further self-discovery.

How many students will be in my Contextual Course classes?

Lectures: 50
Seminars: 10 - 15

Syllabus - Economics Contextual

Studying economics is an opportunity to learn how many of the world’s social systems work. A vast number of specialist fields in economics are grounded in the basic theories you will learn here, and you will explore many of these during your studies.

To complete Economics as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you are required to take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year.

In your first year

You will take two modules.

Introduction to International Development 1

This module provides you with an interdisciplinary introduction to the ideas, historical processes and events, policy debates and practical interventions that are shaping the economic, social and political direction of international development today.

Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics

This module is designed to introduce you to the fundamentals of economic analysis and reasoning.

In your second year

You will take two further modules:

Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics

Details of this module will be added shortly.

Introduction to International Development 2

Details of this module will be added shortly.

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, not all modules will necessarily be available in all years. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

Faculty

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta

BSc (Delhi), BA, MA, PhD (Cantab), FBA, FAAAS

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta lectures for the Economics BSc at New College of the Humanities. He was named a Knight Bachelor in the Queen's 2002 Birthday Honours List for services to economics. Sir Partha has the rare distinction of being a Fellow of both the British Academy and the Royal Society.

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta
BSc (Delhi), BA, MA, PhD (Cantab), FBA, FAAAS

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta lectures for the Economics BSc at New College of the Humanities. He was named a Knight Bachelor in the Queen's 2002 Birthday Honours List for services to economics. Sir Partha has the rare distinction of being a Fellow of both the British Academy and the Royal Society.

Dr Marianna Koli

BSc, MSc, PhD (Manchester)

Marianna joined the College from the University of Birmingham, where she was a Teaching Fellow in the Department of Economics, lecturing in Development Economics, Statistics and Quantitative Methods.

Dr Marianna Koli
BSc, MSc, PhD (Manchester)

Marianna joined the College from the University of Birmingham, where she was a Teaching Fellow in the Department of Economics, lecturing in Development Economics, Statistics and Quantitative Methods.

Professor Niall Ferguson

BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon)

Niall is an expert in Financial and Economic History, as well as Imperial History. Niall’s work as an academic and commentator and broadcaster has inspired debate and discussion throughout his career

Professor Niall Ferguson
BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon)

Niall is an expert in Financial and Economic History, as well as Imperial History. Niall’s work as an academic and commentator and broadcaster has inspired debate and discussion throughout his career

Dr Jungyoon Lee

BA (Cantab), MSc, MRes, PhD (LSE)

Jungyoon received her PhD in Economics and MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics with distinction from the London School of Economics. Prior to that, she obtained her BA in Economics from the University of Cambridge where she was awarded the PriceWaterhouseCoopers Award by the Faculty of Economics. 

Dr Jungyoon Lee
BA (Cantab), MSc, MRes, PhD (LSE)

Jungyoon received her PhD in Economics and MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics with distinction from the London School of Economics. Prior to that, she obtained her BA in Economics from the University of Cambridge where she was awarded the PriceWaterhouseCoopers Award by the Faculty of Economics. 

Dr Melania Nica

MA (Concordia), MSc, MRes, PhD (LSE)

Dr Melania Nica lectures for the Economics BSc at New College of the Humanities.

Dr Melania Nica
MA (Concordia), MSc, MRes, PhD (LSE)

Dr Melania Nica lectures for the Economics BSc at New College of the Humanities.

Dr Georgios Zouros

BSc, MSc (Lond), PhD (LSE)

George joined the College from the London School of Economics where he was a Teaching Fellow lecturing in Quantitative Methods, Operational Research Methods and Logic. He taught Mathematics for Economics at the LSE between 2000 and 2012 both at graduate and undergraduate levels.

Dr Georgios Zouros
BSc, MSc (Lond), PhD (LSE)

George joined the College from the London School of Economics where he was a Teaching Fellow lecturing in Quantitative Methods, Operational Research Methods and Logic. He taught Mathematics for Economics at the LSE between 2000 and 2012 both at graduate and undergraduate levels.

Mr Masud Ally

BA (Cantab), MLitt (St. And), MSc (UCL)

Masud is Lecturer for the Economics BSc at New College of the Humanities. As an undergraduate, Masud read Economics at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. He holds Masters degrees in Management (St Andrews) and Economics (University College, London). After a short stint working in the financial services, he began his doctorate in Economic History, with full ESRC studentship, at Oxford.

Mr Masud Ally
BA (Cantab), MLitt (St. And), MSc (UCL)

Masud is Lecturer for the Economics BSc at New College of the Humanities. As an undergraduate, Masud read Economics at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. He holds Masters degrees in Management (St Andrews) and Economics (University College, London). After a short stint working in the financial services, he began his doctorate in Economic History, with full ESRC studentship, at Oxford.

Learning - Economics Contextual

How will I be taught?

Your lectures will be with students studying Economics for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their Contextual Course. You will attend group seminars twice a term and discuss your essays independently with your tutor.

Assessment

You will complete two assignments for each of your Contextual Course modules. Your grades for these assignments will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

How many students will be in my Contextual Course classes?

Lectures: 50
Seminars: 10 - 15

Syllabus - History Contextual

The study of history complements all of the other degree subjects available here. It will introduce you to a way of using evidence and analysing events that will set the scene for any degree study and prove engaging, absorbing and enjoyable.

To complete the History course as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you will take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year.

In your first year

In your first year, you study two full modules.

The Rich Tapestry of Life: A Social & Cultural History of Europe, c. 1500-1780

This module covers a period of great change, crisis and excitement in the history of Europe, and approaches it through the ways these changes affected ordinary people’s lives, by examining the social and cultural history of the period. Topics will include patriarchy, masculinity, violence, poverty, plague, protest, magic and honour. We examine the seismic shift of the Reformation, the discovery of new worlds and the persecution of witches. The module will direct you to some of the most exciting writing in the recent historiography of early modern Europe and draws on material from both Continental Europe and England.

Republics, Kings & People: The Foundations of Modern Political Culture

This module investigates the origins of our ideas about human rights and duties, revolution and democracy, consent and liberty, and the good life. A number of key writings are studied, ranging from Plato and Aristotle in the ancient world to Machiavelli, More, Hobbes and Locke, through to Rousseau in the Enlightenment. Analysis of the development of fundamental ideas about politics and society sharpens the mind and throws light upon the present from the perspective of the past.

In your second year

British history, 1485-1649

This module covers an exciting period of English political and religious history, stretching from the accession of Henry VII at the Battle of Bosworth to the execution of Charles I. This tumultuous period saw the establishment of the Tudor and Stuart dynasties, the creation of the Church of England, dramatic threats against England from abroad and the execution of four queens and one king.

The principal themes considered are the political changes wrought by the successive dynasties of Tudors and Stuarts, and the opposition they aroused; the coming of the Reformation; the accession of James VI of Scotland to the English throne and its consequences; and the origins, outbreak and course of the civil war, concluding with the execution of the king and the abolition of the House of Lords. The course focuses mostly on England in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, but broadens to include Scotland after the Union of the Crowns in 1603, and Wales and Ireland are also discussed where relevant.

Twentieth-Century World History

The module introduces the study of non-Western history. Its broad sweep can be considered in two parts. The first examines the major political developments that took place in different parts of Asia during the twentieth century, focusing on China, Japan, Southeast Asia and South Asia, exploring the impact of imperialism, nationalism, decolonisation, and independence in order to understand the resurgence of Asian nations by the end of the 1990s.

The second part looks at the history of the non-Western twentieth-century world from the vantage point of developments in the Middle East, Africa and Latin America. From empire-building to revolution in the Middle East, or from intersections between politics and race in Southern Africa, to radical movements and US intervention in Latin America, much of what it explores complements the first part of the course by making sense of political developments in other continents where the long term trends were both similar but, in some ways, noticeably different.

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, modules may be subject to change. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

Faculty

Dr Suzannah Lipscomb

MA, MSt, DPhil (Oxon), FRHistS

Suzannah is an historian, author, broadcaster and award-winning academic. She has a double first in BA History and a distinction in her MSt in Historical Research from Lincoln College, Oxford and DPhil in History from Balliol College, Oxford.

Dr Suzannah Lipscomb
MA, MSt, DPhil (Oxon), FRHistS

Suzannah is an historian, author, broadcaster and award-winning academic. She has a double first in BA History and a distinction in her MSt in Historical Research from Lincoln College, Oxford and DPhil in History from Balliol College, Oxford.

Dr Olly Ayers

BA (Manchester), PhD (Kent)

Olly lectures for the History BA at New College of the Humanities. 

Dr Olly Ayers
BA (Manchester), PhD (Kent)

Olly lectures for the History BA at New College of the Humanities. 

Dr Hannah Dawson

MA, MPhil, PhD (Cantab), FRHistS

Hannah was educated at the University of Cambridge, where she graduated with a double first in History, went on to take the MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History, and received her PhD for her thesis on John Locke and the problem of language in seventeenth century philosophy.

Dr Hannah Dawson
MA, MPhil, PhD (Cantab), FRHistS

Hannah was educated at the University of Cambridge, where she graduated with a double first in History, went on to take the MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History, and received her PhD for her thesis on John Locke and the problem of language in seventeenth century philosophy.

Professor Niall Ferguson

BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon)

Niall is an expert in Financial and Economic History, as well as Imperial History. Niall’s work as an academic and commentator and broadcaster has inspired debate and discussion throughout his career

Professor Niall Ferguson
BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon)

Niall is an expert in Financial and Economic History, as well as Imperial History. Niall’s work as an academic and commentator and broadcaster has inspired debate and discussion throughout his career

Dr Lars Kjaer

BA (Aarhus), MPhil, PhD (Cantab)

Lars obtained his BA in History and Social Anthropology from Aarhus University, Denmark, in 2007. That year he moved to Cambridge, where he completed an MPhil in medieval history.

Dr Lars Kjaer
BA (Aarhus), MPhil, PhD (Cantab)

Lars obtained his BA in History and Social Anthropology from Aarhus University, Denmark, in 2007. That year he moved to Cambridge, where he completed an MPhil in medieval history.

Dr Edmund Neill

MA, DPhil (Oxon), MSc (LSE)

Edmund is an historian specialising in both modern British history and the history of ideas. After reading history as an undergraduate at St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, he gained an MSc in political theory with distinction at the London School of Economics, before returning to Oxford to write a DPhil on Michael Oakeshott and Hannah Arendt, where he was Carlyle Scholar in the history of political thought. 

Dr Edmund Neill
MA, DPhil (Oxon), MSc (LSE)

Edmund is an historian specialising in both modern British history and the history of ideas. After reading history as an undergraduate at St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, he gained an MSc in political theory with distinction at the London School of Economics, before returning to Oxford to write a DPhil on Michael Oakeshott and Hannah Arendt, where he was Carlyle Scholar in the history of political thought. 

Dr Joanne Paul

BAH, MA, PhD (QMUL)

Joanne graduated an MA in Political Theory under the supervision of Professor James Tully at the University of Victoria before studying her PhD in History at Queen Mary, University of London. 

Dr Joanne Paul
BAH, MA, PhD (QMUL)

Joanne graduated an MA in Political Theory under the supervision of Professor James Tully at the University of Victoria before studying her PhD in History at Queen Mary, University of London. 

Learning - History Contextual

How will I be taught?

Your lectures will be with students studying History for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their Contextual Course. You will attend group seminars twice a term and discuss your essays independently with your tutor.

Assessment

You will complete two assignments for each of your Contextual Course modules. Your grades for these assignments will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

How many students will be in my Contextual Course classes?

Lectures: 50
Seminars: 10 - 15

Syllabus - Law Contextual

Law as a Contextual Course provides an induction to some of the principles used in the subject. You will engage with broad legal concepts and gain a basic knowledge of the legal framework. To complete the Law course as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you will be required to take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year.

In your first year

You will study two modules.

Common Law Reasoning & Institutions

This comprehensive introduction to the English legal system seeks to convey what is distinctive about the common law approach as a legal methodology and as it reflects the history and politics of England and Wales. It examines the sources of law, the civil and criminal court structures and the role of judges and the jury. A running concern of the course is the question of fairness: the impact of the Human Rights Act on the criminal justice system and the issues of access to justice in the civil courts. This course is also vital in initiating you into the process of legal research and the final examination has a compulsory section on research activities carried out during the year.

Elements of the Law of Contract

Contracts are the legal basis of all commercial transactions. This module covers the core topics – including formation of contracts, capacity to contract and privity, performance and breach of contract and remedies for breach of contract. The emphasis is on understanding the key underlying principles of English law. This is very much a case law subject, with judicial precedents stretching back nearly 400 years in some instances (but more usually of nineteenth and twentieth century origin) and a small number of statutory provisions, as well as the impact of EU law. An understanding of what factors judges may, or must, take into account when exercising their discretion is crucial.

In your second year

You will study two additional modules.

Criminal Law

This course examines general principles of criminal liability, a range of fatal and non-fatal offences against the person and selected offences against property. Criminal law consists of a highly developed body of precisely formulated legal rules but as criminal conduct is subject to punishment it thus engages with broad issues of morality and policy. Understanding the tension between certainty in the law and social adaptation affects the development of criminal law will take students beyond the basic stage of understanding the substantive rules of criminal law.

Civil & Criminal Procedure

Focused on the substantive issues and values that underpin Civil and criminal procedure, the course is divided equally between Civil and criminal procedure. Students will be expected to compare and contrast Civil and criminal procedure and will need to have a good working knowledge of the court system and the way in which civil and criminal justice is organised and dispensed. Specific topics include: civil process before trial, commencement of proceedings, jurisdiction, responding to a claim, case management, summary disposals and trials, remedies and criminal procedure, police powers and bail, commencement of proceedings, pleas and plea bargaining, ID and other evidence and sentencing.

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, modules may be subject to change. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

Faculty

Mr Damian Warburton

LLB (Hull), LLM (Edin), MSc (Bristol), Barrister

Formerly a Constable, Mr Warburton holds degrees from the universities of Hull, Edinburgh, and Bristol, and was Called to the Bar at the Inner Temple. Prior to joining NCH he held lectureships in law at the University of the West of England, Bristol, and at the University of Buckingham.

Mr Damian Warburton
LLB (Hull), LLM (Edin), MSc (Bristol), Barrister

Formerly a Constable, Mr Warburton holds degrees from the universities of Hull, Edinburgh, and Bristol, and was Called to the Bar at the Inner Temple. Prior to joining NCH he held lectureships in law at the University of the West of England, Bristol, and at the University of Buckingham.

Professor Adrian Zuckerman

LLM (Jerusalem), MA (Oxon)

Adrian Zuckerman is Professor of Civil Procedure at Oxford University, a position he combines with teaching the LLM Civil and Public Litigation course for University College London and King’s College London.

Professor Adrian Zuckerman
LLM (Jerusalem), MA (Oxon)

Adrian Zuckerman is Professor of Civil Procedure at Oxford University, a position he combines with teaching the LLM Civil and Public Litigation course for University College London and King’s College London.

Professor Barbara McDonald

BA (Syd), LLB (Syd), LLM (Lond)

Barbara is a Professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney where she teaches in the areas of Torts, Torts and Contracts, Advanced Obligations and Remedies, and Legal Reasoning and Common Law Systems.

Professor Barbara McDonald
BA (Syd), LLB (Syd), LLM (Lond)

Barbara is a Professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney where she teaches in the areas of Torts, Torts and Contracts, Advanced Obligations and Remedies, and Legal Reasoning and Common Law Systems.

Mr Geoffrey Robertson QC

BA, LLB (Syd), BCL (Oxon)

Geoffrey Robertson has had a distinguished career as a trial counsel and UN appellant judge. He has appeared in landmark cases in media law, and argued hundreds of death sentence appeals.

Mr Geoffrey Robertson QC
BA, LLB (Syd), BCL (Oxon)

Geoffrey Robertson has had a distinguished career as a trial counsel and UN appellant judge. He has appeared in landmark cases in media law, and argued hundreds of death sentence appeals.

Learning - Law Contextual

How will I be taught?

Your lectures will be with students studying Law for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their Contextual Course. You will attend group seminars twice a term and discuss your essays independently with your tutor.

Assessment

You will complete two assignments for each of your Contextual Course modules. Your grades for these assignments will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

How many students will be in my Contextual Course classes?

Lectures: 40
Seminars: 10 - 15

Syllabus - Philosophy Contextual

Philosophical questions arise throughout the practice other disciplines, so Philosophy is connected in myriad ways with other subjects at the College.

We hope that you will take opportunities to discover and explore these connections not only in lectures and tutorials but also informally - with faculty and with each other.

To complete the Philosophy course as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you will take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year.

In your first year

You will take the following two modules:

Introduction to Philosophy

In this course, you will be introduced to the methods and content of philosophy by considering, at an elementary level and in a carefully guided way, some of the central problems that arise within the subject. Included here will be: free-will, determinism and responsibility, personal identity, the relation of the mind to the body, the nature of knowledge, the ideal of equality, issues raised by portrayals of tragedy, the reality of qualities, and our understanding of moral dilemmas.

Ethics: Historical Perspectives

Ethics: Historical Perspectives focuses on the history of moral philosophy, including a study of the works of Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant and Mill. This historical background prepares the way for the second of the ethics modules, which deals with contemporary perspectives. However, the views discussed in this course are not of merely historical interest. Conceptions of morality that are now widely shared were in large part shaped by these thinkers.

In your second year

You will take two of the following two modules:

Epistemology

Epistemology is sometimes known as the theory of knowledge and, as this name suggests, it is a philosophical enquiry into knowledge. The questions it seeks to answer are: What is knowledge? How do we get it? Are the means we employ to get it defensible? These questions prompt a number of debates. One concerns the conditions that have to be satisfied for it to be true that someone knows something. Enquiry into this problem shows that we need to understand belief and its relation to knowledge; and that we have to be clear about the nature of any justification we have for our knowledge claims. Another debate concerns the adequacy of our ways of getting knowledge. We typically employ reason and perception in this task, but the challenge of scepticism shows that the uses we make of them involve a number of serious difficulties. A satisfactory account of knowledge has to address all these matters.

Modern Philosophy: Descartes, Locke, Berkeley & Hume

This module provides a study of the main works of Descartes, Locke, Berkeley and Hume. In particular, it studies the epistemological and metaphysical views of these philosophers. The philosophers Locke, Berkeley and Hume are generally reckoned to be the main representatives of the empiricist tradition, whereas Descartes is seen as one of the forerunners of the rationalist school. However, the work of the empiricists can be seen as a reaction,in part, to Descartes and rationalism generally, so this first subject in modern philosophy begins with Descartes. The label 'modern' is intended as a contrast to 'ancient', (i.e. Plato, the Pre-Socratics and Aristotle, among others). It is generally understood as covering the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, a period in which there was a decisive break with ancient philosophy.

Ethics: Contemporary Perspectives

A description of this module will be added shortly.

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, modules may be subject to change. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

Faculty

Professor AC Grayling

MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA

AC Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon) FRSL, FRSA is Master of the New College of the Humanities, and a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford. Until 2011 he was Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Professor AC Grayling
MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA

AC Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon) FRSL, FRSA is Master of the New College of the Humanities, and a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford. Until 2011 he was Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Professor Simon Blackburn

BA, MA, PhD (Cantab)

Simon is one of the country's leading philosophers, well known for his efforts to make philosophy accessible to a wider public. He is well regarded as a proponent of a distinctive approach to ethics and a defender of neo-Humean views on a variety of topics.

Professor Simon Blackburn
BA, MA, PhD (Cantab)

Simon is one of the country's leading philosophers, well known for his efforts to make philosophy accessible to a wider public. He is well regarded as a proponent of a distinctive approach to ethics and a defender of neo-Humean views on a variety of topics.

Professor Daniel C Dennett

BA (Harvard), DPhil (Oxon)

Daniel is University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He has held visiting positions at Harvard University, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Oxford, the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, and the London School of Economics.

Professor Daniel C Dennett
BA (Harvard), DPhil (Oxon)

Daniel is University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He has held visiting positions at Harvard University, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Oxford, the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, and the London School of Economics.

Professor Steven Pinker

BA (McGill), DPhil (Harvard)

Steven was born in Canada and took his BA in Psychology at McGill University before moving to the US to study for a PhD in Experimental Psychology at Harvard. He has subsequently taught at MIT, Harvard and Stanford.

Professor Steven Pinker
BA (McGill), DPhil (Harvard)

Steven was born in Canada and took his BA in Psychology at McGill University before moving to the US to study for a PhD in Experimental Psychology at Harvard. He has subsequently taught at MIT, Harvard and Stanford.

Professor Ken Gemes

BA (Syd), PhD (Pittsburgh)

Ken is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at New College of the Humanities where he teaches for the Philosophy degree. He has been a professor of philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London and at Yale University. He has a PhD from the University of Pittsburgh.

Professor Ken Gemes
BA (Syd), PhD (Pittsburgh)

Ken is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at New College of the Humanities where he teaches for the Philosophy degree. He has been a professor of philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London and at Yale University. He has a PhD from the University of Pittsburgh.

Dr Naomi Goulder

BA, MA (Cantab), PhD (Lond)

Naomi received a double first in philosophy from the University of Cambridge, studied with a Henry Fellowship in the philosophy department at Harvard, and completed her doctoral degree with an AHRC award at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Dr Naomi Goulder
BA, MA (Cantab), PhD (Lond)

Naomi received a double first in philosophy from the University of Cambridge, studied with a Henry Fellowship in the philosophy department at Harvard, and completed her doctoral degree with an AHRC award at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Dr David Mitchell

BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon) MSc (LSE)

David obtained a double first in Literae Humaniores at Oxford and went on to complete a DPhil there on problems of rationality in epistemology and ethics. He has taught philosophy at the University of Cambridge and the University of London.

Dr David Mitchell
BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon) MSc (LSE)

David obtained a double first in Literae Humaniores at Oxford and went on to complete a DPhil there on problems of rationality in epistemology and ethics. He has taught philosophy at the University of Cambridge and the University of London.

Professor Rebecca Goldstein

BA (Columbia), PhD (Princeton)

Rebecca is both a philosopher and a novelist. She received her PhD in Philosophy from Princeton University and has taught philosophy at Barnard College, Rutgers, and Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

Professor Rebecca Goldstein
BA (Columbia), PhD (Princeton)

Rebecca is both a philosopher and a novelist. She received her PhD in Philosophy from Princeton University and has taught philosophy at Barnard College, Rutgers, and Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

Professor Nicholas Humphrey

BA, MA, PhD (Cantab)

Nicholas is a theoretical psychologist, based in Cambridge, who is known for his work on the evolution of human intelligence and consciousness. He is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the London School of Economics.

Professor Nicholas Humphrey
BA, MA, PhD (Cantab)

Nicholas is a theoretical psychologist, based in Cambridge, who is known for his work on the evolution of human intelligence and consciousness. He is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the London School of Economics.

Dr Christoph Schuringa

BA (Cantab), PhD (Lond)

Christoph got his BA from King's College, Cambridge and his PhD from Birkbeck College, University of London, for a thesis entitled Nietzsche's Historical Philosophy, supervised by Professor Ken Gemes.

Dr Christoph Schuringa
BA (Cantab), PhD (Lond)

Christoph got his BA from King's College, Cambridge and his PhD from Birkbeck College, University of London, for a thesis entitled Nietzsche's Historical Philosophy, supervised by Professor Ken Gemes.

Professor Christopher Peacocke

BA, BPhil, DPhil (Oxon), FBA, FAAAS

Christopher is a Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and Richard Wollheim Professor of Philosophy at University College London. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Professor Christopher Peacocke
BA, BPhil, DPhil (Oxon), FBA, FAAAS

Christopher is a Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and Richard Wollheim Professor of Philosophy at University College London. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Professor Simon May

BA (Lond), MA (Oxon), PhD (Lond)

Simon is Visiting Professor of Philosophy at King’s College, London and at Birkbeck College, London. His interests lie in ethics, German idealism - especially the philosophy of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Heidegger – and philosophy of the emotions. He is also a devotee of the aphoristic form.

Professor Simon May
BA (Lond), MA (Oxon), PhD (Lond)

Simon is Visiting Professor of Philosophy at King’s College, London and at Birkbeck College, London. His interests lie in ethics, German idealism - especially the philosophy of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Heidegger – and philosophy of the emotions. He is also a devotee of the aphoristic form.

Professor Peter Singer

BA, MA, (Melbourne), BPhil (Oxon)

Peter was born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1946, and educated at the University of Melbourne and the University of Oxford. He has taught at the University of Oxford, La Trobe University and Monash University.

Professor Peter Singer
BA, MA, (Melbourne), BPhil (Oxon)

Peter was born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1946, and educated at the University of Melbourne and the University of Oxford. He has taught at the University of Oxford, La Trobe University and Monash University.

Learning - Philosophy Contextual

How will I be taught?

Your lectures will be with students studying Philosophy for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their Contextual Course. You will attend group seminars twice a term and discuss your essays independently with your tutor.

Assessment

You will complete two assignments for each of your Contextual Course modules. Your grades for these assignments will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

How many students will be in my Contextual Course classes?

Lectures: 50

Seminars: 10 - 15

Syllabus - Politics & Int. Relations Contextual

The Politics & International Relations Contextual Course complements each of our degree subjects. You will gain an appreciation of various social organisations, and the relationship between individuals and the state. You will also study the interactions between states both historically and in the present.

To complete the Politics & International Relations course as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you will take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year.

In your first year

You will take two modules:

Introduction to International Relations

This module examines the evolution of International Relations and the international systems it describes, focusing especially on ways in which social structures bring order to our otherwise anarchic international society.In doing so it considers: the evolution of International Relations in practice and theory during the twentieth century; the impact of international history on the development of the discipline prior to 1919; the end of the Cold War and the failure of International Relations to predict this epochal shift; the nature of globalisation and its influence on the discipline's main theories and concepts; the similarities and differences between mainstream approaches to International Relations, the alternatives presented by some of the discipline's newer theoretical schools; the difficulties implicit in defining and limiting war between and within states; the contentious place of peace in international society; the role and responsibilities of the state as one actor among many in the international system; our changing understanding of international power; the impact of globalisation and the end of the Cold War on actors’ definitions of security; the difficulties of global governance in an anarchic international society; and the likely impact of Asia's (especially China's) rise on the units, processes and structures of the international system.

Introduction to Modern Political Thought

This module offers an introduction to some of the great texts of European political theory written since the seventeenth century. The period covers the rise and development of the modern state. This form of political association has come to dominate the modern world and continues to shape the structure of modern politics. These texts provide an insight into how this emerging political form is understood, defended and criticised. The module also covers the nature and purpose of political theory in a world of states.

In your second year

You will take two modules:

Politics & Policies of the European Union

The detailed aims of the course are to provide an introduction to the analytical parameters which shape the processes of European integration. Students will be familiarised with key events and major treaty developments relating to the EU, provide analytical tools and guidelines on how to judge the future of the European project, analyse internal EU policies and their impact on European, but also non European societies, focus on the external dimension of EU and its impact on the outside world and identify potential avenues for the future course of European integration.

Comparative Politics

This course is concerned mainly with the question of how different kinds of political systems work. It focuses both on the political process and on the role of government. The syllabus considers mainly democratic government and considers the main variations between different kinds of democracy. Topics that will be examined include presidential and parliamentary systems, legitimacy and political culture, the nature and role of the state; bureaucracy; the judicial power, the role of the military, forms of political organisation; parties and interest groups, electoral systems and party competition and federal and unitary states.

Faculty

Dr Diana Bozhilova

BA (Hons), PhD (KCL)

Diana Bozhilova was awarded a first class honours degree with distinction in European Studies/German at King’s College London. She then completed her PhD in the Europeanization of Justice and Home Affairs and Industrial Policy reform in CEE.

Dr Diana Bozhilova
BA (Hons), PhD (KCL)

Diana Bozhilova was awarded a first class honours degree with distinction in European Studies/German at King’s College London. She then completed her PhD in the Europeanization of Justice and Home Affairs and Industrial Policy reform in CEE.

Professor Vernon Bogdanor CBE

BA, MA (Oxon), FBA

Professor Vernon Bogdanor is Research Professor at the Institute of Contemporary History, King's College, London. He was formerly for many years Professor of Government at Oxford University.

Professor Vernon Bogdanor CBE
BA, MA (Oxon), FBA

Professor Vernon Bogdanor is Research Professor at the Institute of Contemporary History, King's College, London. He was formerly for many years Professor of Government at Oxford University.

Dr Marianna Koli

BSc, MSc, PhD (Manchester)

Marianna joined the College from the University of Birmingham, where she was a Teaching Fellow in the Department of Economics, lecturing in Development Economics, Statistics and Quantitative Methods.

Dr Marianna Koli
BSc, MSc, PhD (Manchester)

Marianna joined the College from the University of Birmingham, where she was a Teaching Fellow in the Department of Economics, lecturing in Development Economics, Statistics and Quantitative Methods.

Learning - Politics & Int Relations Contextual

How will I be taught?

Your lectures will be with students studying Politics & International Relations for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their Contextual Course. You will attend group seminars twice a term and discuss your essays independently with your tutor.

Assessment

You will complete two assignments for each of your Contextual Course modules. Your grades for these assignments will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

How many students will be in my Contextual Course classes?

Lectures: 50
Seminars: 10 - 15

Syllabus - Psychology

The study of psychology increases your understanding of the complexity of human behaviour in different situations and contexts through science and philosophy. Whether you are studying English, Economics, History, Law, Philosophy or Politics & International Relations for your degree, this Contextual Course will inform your studies and broaden your outlook. 

In your first year

You will take the following two modules:

Introduction to Psychology

This highly interactive module takes you on a tour of the study of Psychology from early philosophical definitions to contemporary applications of psychology in society.

You will explore its history, major theories, techniques and challenges. Topics studied include perception and memory, learning, development, and language, consciousness, social psychology, experimentation, abnormal psychology, treatments and therapies.

The module concludes with sessions on psychology and culture, cognition and the law, criminological psychology and ethics.

Neuropsychology

Details to be announced in Summer 2014.

In your second year

You will take two of the following two modules:

Behaviour, Emotion, Thought & their Problems

Details to be announced in Summer 2014.

Perception, Learning & Memory

Details to be announced in Summer 2014.

Faculty

Mr Fintan Nagle

BSc, MSc (York), MRes (UCL), PhD (pending)

Fintan Nagle lectures on the Psychology Contextual Course at New College of the Humanities.

Fintan achieved an MRes with Merit in Modelling Biological Complexity from UCL (2011); he also holds an MSc, with Merit, in Natural Computation from the University of York (2010) and a First Class Honours BSc also from the University of York (2009). During his MRes, Fintan completed projects in the field of psychology on topics in areas such as mapping the structure of the brain from electron micrographs and studying animal behaviour in marine creatures. 

Mr Fintan Nagle
BSc, MSc (York), MRes (UCL), PhD (pending)

Fintan Nagle lectures on the Psychology Contextual Course at New College of the Humanities.

Fintan achieved an MRes with Merit in Modelling Biological Complexity from UCL (2011); he also holds an MSc, with Merit, in Natural Computation from the University of York (2010) and a First Class Honours BSc also from the University of York (2009). During his MRes, Fintan completed projects in the field of psychology on topics in areas such as mapping the structure of the brain from electron micrographs and studying animal behaviour in marine creatures. 

Professor Daniel C Dennett

BA (Harvard), DPhil (Oxon)

Daniel is University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He has held visiting positions at Harvard University, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Oxford, the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, and the London School of Economics.

Professor Daniel C Dennett
BA (Harvard), DPhil (Oxon)

Daniel is University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He has held visiting positions at Harvard University, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Oxford, the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, and the London School of Economics.

Professor Steven Pinker

BA (McGill), DPhil (Harvard)

Steven was born in Canada and took his BA in Psychology at McGill University before moving to the US to study for a PhD in Experimental Psychology at Harvard. He has subsequently taught at MIT, Harvard and Stanford.

Professor Steven Pinker
BA (McGill), DPhil (Harvard)

Steven was born in Canada and took his BA in Psychology at McGill University before moving to the US to study for a PhD in Experimental Psychology at Harvard. He has subsequently taught at MIT, Harvard and Stanford.

Professor Christopher Peacocke

BA, BPhil, DPhil (Oxon), FBA, FAAAS

Christopher is a Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and Richard Wollheim Professor of Philosophy at University College London. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Professor Christopher Peacocke
BA, BPhil, DPhil (Oxon), FBA, FAAAS

Christopher is a Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and Richard Wollheim Professor of Philosophy at University College London. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Learning - Psychology

How will I be taught?

Your lectures will be with fellow students studying Psychology as their Contextual Course. You will attend group seminars twice a term and discuss your essays independently with your tutor.

Assessment

You will complete two assignments for each of your Contextual Course modules. Your grades for these assignments will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma.

How many students will be in my Contextual Course classes?

Lectures: 40

Seminars: 10 - 15

Syllabus - Core Modules

All students at the College study three compulsory core modules in addition to their other undergraduate studies. The core modules are Applied Ethics, Logic & Critical Thinking, and Science Literacy. Your studies in these modules will contribute to your grade for the NCH Diploma which is awarded alongside your degree.

Applied Ethics

The aim of this module is to introduce you to the principal theories of ethics including their historical and conceptual foundations, and to explore their application to important questions in private and public life. The module covers:

  • Theories of ethics
  • Problems and debates in business ethics
  • Environmental ethics

  • Medical ethics
  • Public ethics

  • Civil liberties and human rights

  • The nature of the good and the good life

Professor A C Grayling, Professor Peter Singer and Dr Naomi Goulder teach the Applied Ethics module through participative lectures.

Logic & Critical Thinking

The aim of this module is to introduce the methods and principles of good reasoning.  It develops your ability to identify truth-preserving patterns of argument, evaluate evidence, and effectively communicate ideas. It covers:

  • Concepts and techniques of formal logic
  • The tropes of informal logic
  • Critical thinking

Professor A C Grayling and Professor Ken Gemes teach the Logic & Critical Thinking module through participative lectures.

Science Literacy

The aim of this module is for you to develop an intelligent insight into central areas of science, principally cosmology, fundamental physics and quantum theory, evolutionary biology, genetics and human evolution.  The module is designed for non-scientists, requiring minimal mathematical skills. It covers:

  • Cosmology
  • Evolution
  • Physics
  • Social Science

Professor Lawrence M Krauss and Professor Richard Dawkins teach this module through participative lectures. In Michaelmas 2012 Professor Lawrence M. Krauss delivered seven lectures on the topic “Big Bang: Life, the Universe and Everything” as part of the Science Literacy module. Professor Richard Dawkins FRS will deliver four lectures in Michaelmas term as part of the Science Literacy module.

Faculty

Professor AC Grayling

MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA

AC Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon) FRSL, FRSA is Master of the New College of the Humanities, and a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford. Until 2011 he was Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Professor AC Grayling
MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA

AC Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon) FRSL, FRSA is Master of the New College of the Humanities, and a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford. Until 2011 he was Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London.

Professor Ken Gemes

BA (Syd), PhD (Pittsburgh)

Ken is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at New College of the Humanities where he teaches for the Philosophy degree. He has been a professor of philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London and at Yale University. He has a PhD from the University of Pittsburgh.

Professor Ken Gemes
BA (Syd), PhD (Pittsburgh)

Ken is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at New College of the Humanities where he teaches for the Philosophy degree. He has been a professor of philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London and at Yale University. He has a PhD from the University of Pittsburgh.

Professor Lawrence Krauss

BSc (Carleton), DPhil (MIT)

Lawrence Krauss was born in New York but raised in Canada. Lawrence took undergraduate degrees in Mathematics and Physics from Carleton University and a PhD from MIT. He taught at Yale before moving on to Case Western and Arizona State Universities.

Professor Lawrence Krauss
BSc (Carleton), DPhil (MIT)

Lawrence Krauss was born in New York but raised in Canada. Lawrence took undergraduate degrees in Mathematics and Physics from Carleton University and a PhD from MIT. He taught at Yale before moving on to Case Western and Arizona State Universities.

Professor Peter Singer

BA, MA, (Melbourne), BPhil (Oxon)

Peter was born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1946, and educated at the University of Melbourne and the University of Oxford. He has taught at the University of Oxford, La Trobe University and Monash University.

Professor Peter Singer
BA, MA, (Melbourne), BPhil (Oxon)

Peter was born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1946, and educated at the University of Melbourne and the University of Oxford. He has taught at the University of Oxford, La Trobe University and Monash University.

Professor Richard Dawkins

BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRS, FRSL

A prize-winning evolutionary biologist, Richard Dawkins is one of Britain’s best-known academics and was the inaugural Professor for Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University.

Professor Richard Dawkins
BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRS, FRSL

A prize-winning evolutionary biologist, Richard Dawkins is one of Britain’s best-known academics and was the inaugural Professor for Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University.

Professor Simon May

BA (Lond), MA (Oxon), PhD (Lond)

Simon is Visiting Professor of Philosophy at King’s College, London and at Birkbeck College, London. His interests lie in ethics, German idealism - especially the philosophy of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Heidegger – and philosophy of the emotions. He is also a devotee of the aphoristic form.

Professor Simon May
BA (Lond), MA (Oxon), PhD (Lond)

Simon is Visiting Professor of Philosophy at King’s College, London and at Birkbeck College, London. His interests lie in ethics, German idealism - especially the philosophy of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Heidegger – and philosophy of the emotions. He is also a devotee of the aphoristic form.

Syllabus - Professional Programme

The programme is studied throughout your three years at New College of the Humanities. It consists of seminars, exercises delivered over electronic media, project work, and small group face-to-face discussions with professionals from a variety of backgrounds and industries.

Each year, students work in teams to address live issues faced by a range of organisations. In the past, students here have developed projects for Give Me Tap, International Refugee Trust, Into University and Debate Mate.

In your first year

You will study the following:

Foundation Capabilities

  • Writing and presenting
  • CVs & Covering Letters
  • Working in Teams
  • Making it Happen
  • Interview Skills
  • Marketing
  • Research Techniques

You will also complete a summer project.

In your second year

You will study the following:

Entrepreneurship, Innovation & Self-Reliance

  • Financial Literacy
  • Application Forms & Personal Conduct at Interviews & Assessments
  • Personal Presentation & Networking
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Evaluating Career Choices for Humanities Graduates
  • Problem Solving
  • Strategy

You will also complete a summer project.

In your third year

You will study the following:

Statistics, Technology & Negotiation

  • Statistics
  • The Impact of Technology
  • Negotiation
  • Working in Teams

Throughout all three years

You may attend an informal speaker and networking programme:

My Beautiful Career

Visting speakers, who took a humanities degree and now have an outstanding career in a wide variety of fields visit NCH in each Michaelmas and Hilary term.

During these highly interactive sessions, the speakers discuss what they studied, how it has benefitted them, what they do, what they did when they first started, why they enjoy it and what are the downsides, and how they got into the job.

We have welcomed speakers from a wide range of organisations including:

  • Clifford Chance
  • Penningtons
  • Bain & Co
  • School of Communication Arts
  • Disney
  • AP Watt
  • The Economist
  • RDF Television
  • The Sunday Times
  • Eden Ventures
  • BBC
  • Google
  • Coca Cola
  • Cubo Communications
  • Karmarama
  • B&Q
  • News Fixed
  • Deutsche Bank
  • Lion TV
  • UBS
  • Chatham House
  • Synergy Sponsorship
  • Twitter
  • Cheyne Capital
  • Bourne Leisure
  • Royal Historic Palaces

The sessions are informal and are not compulsory. 

Assessment

The Professional Programme is assessed through a series of written assignments and presentations as each seminar series is completed. Your studies in the Professional Programme will contribute to your grade for the New College of the Humanities Diploma, which is awarded alongside your degree.

Faculty

Mr Matthew Batstone

MA (Cantab), MBA (INSEAD)

Matthew Batstone was educated at Cambridge University where he earned a MA in English Literature, and at INSEAD where he graduated with an MBA with distinction.

Mr Matthew Batstone
MA (Cantab), MBA (INSEAD)

Matthew Batstone was educated at Cambridge University where he earned a MA in English Literature, and at INSEAD where he graduated with an MBA with distinction.

Ms Swatee Jasoria

BSc, MA (Sheffield), Juris Doctor (Rutgers Law School, NJ, USA),

Born in India, Swatee grew up in the UK and Hong Kong. She studied at the University of Sheffield, where she attained a BSc in Genetics, and then an MA in Biotechnology, Law & Ethics. After completing her MA, Swatee moved to the USA and completed her Juris Doctor at Rutgers University School of Law – Newark, New Jersey.

Ms Swatee Jasoria
BSc, MA (Sheffield), Juris Doctor (Rutgers Law School, NJ, USA),

Born in India, Swatee grew up in the UK and Hong Kong. She studied at the University of Sheffield, where she attained a BSc in Genetics, and then an MA in Biotechnology, Law & Ethics. After completing her MA, Swatee moved to the USA and completed her Juris Doctor at Rutgers University School of Law – Newark, New Jersey.

Syllabus - Core Modules Logic & Crit Thinking

Throughout each academic year the College’s visiting professors deliver a wide variety of lectures. Some of these form the Core Courses for the NCH Diploma (and are compulsory); some are subject-specific, but open to all; and some are of general interest to all students.

From the 2013 academic year, the College expects to offer 110 professorial lectures in each academic year. Professorial lectures are scheduled in such a way that no other lecture or tutorial clashes with them. To make the most of your time at College, you are encouraged to attend as many of these lectures as possible.

Click on the names below to see a selection of the professorial lectures delivered in the 2012/13 academic year.

Professor A C Grayling

Logic & Critical Thinking half module

  • Five lectures on Concepts of Logic
  • Five lectures on Critical Reasoning

Professor Simon Blackburn

Lecture series: Eight lectures on Truth, Beauty and Goodness

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta

Economics

  • Trust
  • Incentives for Keeping Agreements I
  • Incentives for Keeping Agreements II
  • Incentives for Keeping Agreements III
  • Social Preferences
  • Normative Economics

Professor Daniel C Dennett

Science Literacy

  • The Installation of Cultural Software
  • The Virtual Machines of Consciousness
  • How Active Symbols Create Intelligence Designers
  • Turning two views of consciousness into one: is it possible? (with Professor Nicholas Humphrey)

Professor Richard Dawkins

Science Literacy

  • Evolution for Non-scientists I
  • Science Literacy Evolution for Non-scientists II
  • Science Literacy Evolution for Non-scientists III
  • Science Literacy Evolution for Non-scientists IV

Professor Ronald Dworkin

Legal, moral and political philosophy:

  • Colloquium with Professor T M Scanlon
  • Colloquium with Professor John Taseoulis
  • Colloquium with Professor Jeremy Waldron
  • Colloquium with Lord Sumption OBE
  • Colloquium with US Supreme Court Justice Breyer

Professor Niall Ferguson

  • New approaches to the History of Western Civilisation

Professor Ken Gemes

Logic & Critical Thinking

  • Why Value Truth?
  • What Separates Science from Non-Science 1: Causation and Explanation
  • What Separates Science from Non-Science II: Inductivism and Hypothetico-Deductivism
  • What Separates Science from Non-Science III: Falsificationism
  • Observation and Objectivity
  • Scientific Realism
  • Constructive Empiricism
  • Quantum Mechanics and Causality
  • Bayesian Confirmation Theory I: Probability Calculus
  • Bayesian Confirmation Theory II: Applications

Professor Rebecca Goldstein

Philosophy & Literature

  • Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems in the Context of Epistemology
  • Socrates Must Die: The Ethos of the Extraordinary and the Birth of Philosophy
  • Spinoza’s Mind
  • Philosophy and the Novel

Howard Jacobson

Creative Writing

  • My Writing Life

Professor Lawrence M Krauss

From the Big Bang to Eternity: Life, The Universe & Everything 

  • A Tour of the Universe
  • Cosmic Connections
  • The Secret Life of Physicists
  • Energy & the Universe: The Big Bang, Dark Matter, & the Geometry of Space I
  • Energy & the Universe: The Big Bang, Dark Matter, & the Geometry of Space II
  • The Origin of the Elements & the Origin of the Earth
  • Life on Earth, Past, Present, & Miserable Future

Professor Simon May

  • What is Love? 

Professor Barbara McDonald

  • Common Law I
  • Common Law II

Professor Steven Pinker

Science Literacy

  • The human brain I
  • The human brain II
  • The human brain III
  • The human brain IV

Professor Sir Christopher Ricks

English Literature

  • A Matter of Principles
  • Shakespeare, King Lear 
  • The Charge of Misogyny: Donne, as well as T.S. Eliot and Bob Dylan
  • And Measure Still for Measure 

Dr Anthony Seldon

  • Thatcher in History 

Professor Peter Singer

  • Utilitarianism: A Sidgwickian Defence
  • Ethics and Living Ethically 

Professor Adrian Zuckerman

Law

  • The English Legal System and the Common Law Tradition 
  • Trial by stealth - a democratic deficit 
  • Human Rights in Civil and Criminal Procedure
  • The Civil Justice Process
  • The Political Economy of Justice - The Legal Aid Dilemma
  • The English Disease: Access to Court Blighted by High and Unpredictable Cost
  • The Implications of the Voluntary Nature of Contracts
  • On Contracts